b3b logo

contents graphic 

web site policy

your birthday today?

Search results take a few seconds and open in a  new window. May need to allow Pop Ups to see results.

 

 

 

Brownielocks and The 3 Bears
presents
Hurricane Categories + Cartoon

Our cartoon  is a spoof  based on the actual Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale. See below.

Hurricane Season runs from June to November.

How are hurricanes rated by categories? 
What do they mean?

 In the late 1960's, Herbert Saffir developed a system to help rate potential damage done by hurricane winds.  Then, this scale was upgraded  (as we know it today)  in the early 1970s by Herbert Saffir,  then a consulting engineer in Coral Gables, Florida, and Dr. Robert Simpson, then Director of the National Hurricane Center.  The priority of the rating is all based on the speed of the wind, plus estimates of the barometric pressure as well as the storm surge.  Combining all of this hopefully gives as accurate as possible estimate of  the amount of property damage and flooding that is to be expected along a coastal area where the hurricane is predicted to hit land.  Unfortunately, this scale can not predict the loss of life.
Below is the actual Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale, that we based our cartoon on above.

Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale

Category 1
Minimal
Winds 74 to 95 mph    Surge = 4 to 5 Ft.
Category 2
Moderate
Winds 96 to 110 mph   Surge =  6 to 8 Ft.
Category 3
Extensive
Winds 111 to 130 mph   Surge = 9 to 12 Ft.
Category 4
Extreme
Winds 131 to 155 mph   Surge = 13 to 18  Ft.
Category 5
Catastrophic
Winds 155  mph or greater Surge = 18  Ft. or more

 


How does a Hurricane get it's name and why?

Naming hurricanes began hundreds of years ago. But only recently did they begin to be named after women.  It was during World War II that forecasters and meteorologists began using female names in identifying the storms. In 1953 the US weather service officially adopted the idea and created a new phonetic alphabet (international) of women's names from A to W.  Perhaps Women's Liberation in the 60's and 70's helped change the naming of storms to include male names in 1978.

Why name a hurricane? It's much easier and less confusing than trying to remember a storm by it's longitude and latitude.  It's also easier when you have more than one storm you are tracking. This is especially important in relaying messages between weather stations and ships or between ship to ship communications. Also, imagine your local weatherman being all tongue-tied with data. It's much easier for him or her to say "Hurricane Jane Reports" or even for historical weather records such as Hurricane Camille.

Because storms know no boundaries as far as geographical countries, the names have been given some international flair. Who picks the names?  They are agreed upon during the World Meteorological Organization by all the nations involved. How they come up with the names to vote on, I'm not sure. Do they nominate the names of their children, wives, girlfriends, relatives?  (If anyone knows please write me. I wrote them but they've never answered me.)  Names can be retired and replaced with another names in the event of severe storms. For example: You can have TS Jane (Tropical Storm Jane) that can turn into Hurricane Jane. There have been variations. For example:  Hurricane Mark and Hurricane Marc.

Do they run out of names? There are two lists. One for the Atlantic Ocean and one for the Eastern Pacific Ocean.  These lists are rotated year by year. As a result, names in 2001 will also be used in 2007. Now, the exception is the Central and Western Pacific Ocean. Those names are not rotated on a yearly basis.

The National Hurricane Center near Miami, Florida USA keeps an alert eye on all oceanic storms.  If winds are more than 39 miles per hour, it is officially a Tropical Storm and will be given a name. If it's under 39 miles per hour, well it's just a mighty big gusty wind. ;)

 

Will you be a Hurricane someday? If your name is one of the following below, you have already been one and your name is retired. Why are some hurricane names retired? For the hurricanes that are severe and cause a lot of property damage and/or loss of life, the name is retired because re-using it is felt to be insensitive to the victims. The name is then not used for at least ten years, or never again. 
As far as I know, none of the retired hurricane names below have been reused, even after ten years.  There can be, however, name variations. For example, in 2009 the name "Grace" is listed.  Yet below the retired name of "Gracie" is listed.  

Once a name is officially retired, it is then replaced with a name of the same gender and beginning with the same letter.  For example, Katrina could be replaced with Karen or Kate? But, Katrina will not be replaced with a male "K" name say like Karl. So far, since 1972, there have been 50 names that have been retired. And, since the names in the beginning of the alphabet get used more than those at the end, it's more likely that those will be retired names first.  So, if your name is towards the back of the alphabet (like my name of Sheila), the odds are you might not even get to be a hurricane name, let alone be a retired one. Below is a listing (as I know it today) of retired hurricane names. Since the storms were first named  beginning in 1953, they dropped two the next year. In 1954, Carol and Hazel were the first hurricane retirees. For 2005, 5 names are now retired: Katrina, Dennis, Rita, Stan and Wilma.  This is the MOST retired names for a single year ever! Their replacement names are now on the 2005 list of hurricane names with after them.

Retired Hurricane Names
(I've attempted to be as updated and accurate as possible. If you know of a retired name I missed, please let me know.)


Agnes
(1972)
Alicia
(1983)
Allen
(1980)
Allison
(2001)
Andrew
(1992)
Anita
(1977)
Audrey
(1957)
Betsy
(1965)
Bob
(1991)
Beulah
(1967)
Camille
(1969)
Carla
(1961)
Carmen (1974)

Carol
(1954)
Celia
(1970)
Cesar
(1996)
Charley (2004)
Cleo
(1964)
Connie
(1955)
David
(1979)
Dean (2007)
Dennis
(2005)
Diana 
(1990)
Dianne
(1955)
Donna
(1960)
Dora
(1964)
Edna
(1968)

Elena
(1985)
Eloise
(1975)
Felix (2007)
FiFi
(1974)
Flora
(1963)
Floyd
(1999)
Fran
(1996)
Frances (2004)
Frederic
(1979)
Georges
(1998)
Gilbert
(1988)
Gloria
(1985)
Gracie (1959)
Gustav (2008)
Hattie
(1961)

Hazel
(1954)
Hilda
(1964)
Hortense
(1996)
Hugo
(1989)
Ike (2008)
Inez
(1966)
Ione
(1955)
Iris
(2001)
Isabel
(2003)
Isadore (2002)
Ivan (2004)
Janet
(1955)
Jeanne (2004)
Joan (1988)
Juan (2003)
Katrina (2005)


Keith
(2000)
Klaus
(1990)
Lili (2002)
Luis
(1995)
Lenny
(1999)
Marilyn
(1995)
Michelle
(2001)
Mitch
(1998)
Noel (2007)
Opal
(1995)
Paloma (2008)
Rita (2005)
Roxanne
(1995)
Sandy (2013)
Stan (2005)
Wilma (2005)

.

Has a Hurricane had your name? Or will there be a Hurricane with your name perhaps? 
 What happens if they use up all the names on the list for their year? Then they start naming them by the Greek alphabet.
Alpha, Beta, Gamma, etc.  And, that's just what they had to do in 2005. They ran out of names because it was the busiest hurricane season on record. So, they started naming the hurricanes by Greek letters. 

Why use Greek letters? Why not start again at the beginning with another "A" name? Or, don't they have any ideas? The Director of the National Hurricane Center has a file folder filled with names.  It's not like he doesn't have any or needs our ideas. But, this has been the policy once all 21 letter have been used up.  Why only 21 when we have 26 letters in the alphabet? The Hurricane Center doesn't name hurricanes starting with the letters Q, U, X, Y and Z because there just are not enough name options (male and female) for those letters. 

Are there any requirements to a hurricane name? In a way, yes. The name has to be short and easy to say on the TV or radio. Since the World Meteorological Association represents 120 countries, the hurricane name has to be culturally acceptable to everyone and not in any way cause disrespect.  

Below the list are links to the national weather pages listing the most current names.

 Names For Atlantic Storms Only!

1996
Arthur
Bertha
Cesar
Dolly
Edouard
Fran
Gustav
Hortense
Josephine
Kyle
Marco
Nanav
Omar
Paloma
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred
1997
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Grace
Henri
Isabel
Juan
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
1998
Alex
Bonnie
Charley
Danielle
Earl
Frances
Georges
Hermine
Ivan
Jeanne
Karl
Lisa
Mitch
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter
1999
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Dennis
Emily
Floyd
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katrina
Lenny
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rita
Stan
Tammy
Vince
Wilma
2000
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Keith
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
2001
Allison
Barry
Chantal
Dean
Erin
Felix
Gabrielle
Humberto
Iris
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Michelle
Noel
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Arthur Ana Alex Arlene Alberto Andrea
Bertha Bill Bonnie Bret Beryl Barry
Cristobal Claudette Charley Cindy Chris Chantal
Dolly Danny Danielle Don Debby Dean
Edouard Erika Earl Emily Ernesto Erin
Fay Fabian Frances Franklin Florence Felix
Gustav Grace Gaston Gert Gordon Gabrielle
Hanna Henri Hermine Harvey Helene Humberto
Isidore Isabel* Ivan Irene Isaac Ingrid
Josephine     Jose Joyce Jerry
Kyle Kate Karl Katia Kirk Karen
Lili Larry Lisa Lee Leslie Lorenzo
Marco Mindy Matthew Maria Michael Melissa
Nana Nicholas Nicole Nate Nadine Noel
Omar Odette Otto Ophelia Oscar Olga
Paloma Peter Paula Philippe Patty Pablo
Rene Rose Richard Rina Rafael Rebekah
Sally Sam Shary Sean Sandy Sebastien
Teddy Teresa Tomas Tammy Tony Tanya
Vicky Victor Virginie Vince Valerie Van
Wilfred Wanda Walter Whitney William Wendy

 

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gustav
Hanna
Ike
Josephine
Kyle
Lili*
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paloma
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Fred
Grace
Henri
Ida
Joaquin
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy (Sara 2018)
Tony
Valerie
William

 

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Andrea
Barry
Chantal Dorian
Erin
Fernand
Gabrielle Humberto Ingrid
Jerry
Karen Lorenzo Melissa Nestor
Olga
Pablo Rebekah Sebastien Tanya
Van
Wendy
       

 

Note: These lists are also re-cycled every six years. So, the 2007 names are now the 2013 names,
except for Dean who was retired and replaced by Dorian.  And Noel got replaced by Nestor.

 

*Hurricane Isabel came to our house on Sept. 18, 2003.
We were not hurt, but lost power for days!
Here is our cartoon dedicated to all who lose power for days during hurricanes
or any other types of storms.  Power Outage or Black Out Cartoon.

Another cartoon we made pertaining to Severe TV Weather Alerts in 2008.

I would like to add that I was in New Orleans two weeks before Hurricane Katrina hit.
I loved that town and had plan to visit  it again when the weather was cooler.  I truly wish all the people of the Gulf area, as well as New Orleans, physical, mental and spiritual strength in rebuilding their lives.

 

 NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association) has a listing of names for all the oceans in the world!. The page is NCEP and part of their Cyclone Section.  
Click here to visit that page.

FEMA
(Federal Emergency Management Administration)
Has a site for kids listing  all current and future hurricane names also.
CLICK HERE

Tornado Information from US Insurance

 

 

Since most of the Hurricanes that affect the United States are in the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, I listed only those names. If you want to check on other names in other areas, we recommend the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Administration or the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida.

This site explains the "Fujita Scale" of ranking storm severity. Plus many other informative areas.

There are too many weather sites! But here is one  I found that gives a pretty good explanation of how they rank hurricanes/tornadoes + a vast amount of information including hurricane glassware.
<----Click the Storm Cloud

 

 

"Wind Chimes"  Wave File from Macs Gems.

Return to our other June Observances

Like this background? Get one for your site!

All graphics on this site (still and animated) have our embedded watermark. They are not public domain!

All contents (Graphics and Text)  are covered by U.S. Copyright Laws. No reproduction of any kind, downloading, copy, paste, save, etc. is allowed.    All rights reserved!

digimarc icon

surfing the net with kids trophy image
(Awarded 1/28/2009)

Thanks for Visiting. We love you! 

Brownielocks is now on

EMAIL ON HOME PAGE ONLY

PS: My web stats show we have now had over 47 MILLION unique visitors!  
Home | Contents | Backgrounds | Bizarre Holidays | Cartoons | Word Fun | Jokes | Traditional Holidays 
Brownielocks' Holidays & Fun For Everyone!  1999-2014