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Brownielocks and The 3 Bears
Present

 

Let me begin by saying that Morse Code (or CW as Hams call it) is taught and done via sounds, not visually like we are taught to read.  But, for doing palindromes in which you read letters forwards and backwards, morse code becomes visual via its dits and dahs.  In a morse code palindrome, the dits and dahs work both forwards or backwards and spell the same word!  Now, there are some words that are palindromes in the English language that are also palindromes via morse code.
Examples are:  rotor, sees, noon, mom, peep.

Now to think via dits and dahs!  We'll begin really simple.
Below is an example of the word "Poop" in morse code.

Now here is the word in reverse.


This is very easy because the dits and dahs in morse code are also the same in reverse
for each letter.  P = Dit, dah, dah, Dit.  If you say that in reverse you still get "P."

 

But, what happens when you have to start jumping boundaries of the morse code
letters to create your dits and dahs going in reverse direction?
Below is an example when that happens by using the word "Taint."
Taint is not a palindrome in the English language.  But it is in morse code.

 

Do you see how it is a palindrome in morse code?
Here is the result:

 

Let's try another word where you have to reach out and well...touch a few dits and dahs
that were together in a group when reading left to right, but get shuffled a bit when
creating a palindrome.  We'll use the word "Acetate."

 

The letter "A" is  Dit-Dah.  You can see that reading this left to right.
But, what happens when you go in reverse?  Well, you suddenly have to
take the single dit (E) and the single dah (T) and blend them to create
a dit-dah combination for the A when reading Right to Left.

Morse code palindromes are like a secret mystery code and lots of fun.
Are you catching on yet?

Here's a morse code palindrome.  It's reading the same forward and backwards as far
as the dits and dahs go.  But, this word is not a palindrome in the English language. It's only in morse code.
What's the word?

Here is the answer:  Click Here

And, here is how it is explained how it's a morse code palindrome:  Click Here

This was just so easy, right? 

I gave you short words.  But here are some long ones that are also morse code palindromes.
(They were too long to graphically show you across the screen)

Freshened,  Protectorate,  Indebted, Saturates, Viewable, Wrecking, Researcher, Annexing and Peruvian.

A few proper nouns are also morse code palindromes:  Ohio and Tokyo

There are lots and lots of words that are palindromes in morse code.  Here are some of them.
Take time to write them out and see how their dits and dahs read both forwards and backwards
and spell the same word(s).

Gnaw
Task
Waiting
Footstool
Emit Time
Seizes
Alike
Visits
Garnet
Gets Stew
Scents
Loop Poof
Old UFO
Sold UFOs
Pets Step
Famine
Wring
Irks
Squats
Hogs
Biggest
Deepest
Wang
Dimmest
Medley


Fever Rebel
Aching
Goat
Diet
Comment
Beset
Awoke
Awake
Scale
Hides
Looter
Tea
Mainly
Kaiser Resink
Postman
Washing
Startle
Leader
Heiress
Wisp
Avenue
Homes
Best
Tart
Villas
Fished

 

Tang Want
VISAS
Cheek
Sags
Cohort
Starts
After
Etching
Skirts
Sleeves
Wean
Test
Equate
Hares
Outdo
Intend
Herbs
Used
Weep
Famine
Queenly
Hisses
Risen
Garnett



 

Also some names are:
Robert Trevor
Alec, Asher, Austin, Bertha
Eden, Fred, Joe, Marcy, Mary, Peg,
Rueben, Stevie, Theresa, Tina and Tom.

However, we have Wang in the above list.
If you create Tom Wang for a name, it isn't a morse code palindrome
even though separately they are.  Thus, creating a sentence that is
a morse code palindrome would be a real challenge!

 


(Which is  a palindrome in Morse Code too!)

Want more fun with Ham Radio?
Visit our  Ham Radio Bingo page.

Don't forget to check out  my Zazzle Ham Radio store, Click Here! 
Lots of fun Ham Radio items for holidays or all year long.

 

 



Plus the other word fun pages we offer:

Visit our basic Palindrome page

 



Enjoy some very strange words from our past; or, ones very seldom used today.


Credit:
I did not create these morse code palindromes.  The idea popped up in a conversation
during a recent NAQP-CW event that I was part of.  These were given to me
by former amateur radio operator, Keith F. Lynch.

We didn't use a watercolor background for this page so you'd see the dits and dahs clearer.
But we offer 1,900 on our main backgrounds page.  Check them out!

All graphics on this site (still and animated) have our embedded watermark. They are not public domain!

All contents (Graphics and Text)  are covered by U.S. Copyright Laws. No reproduction of any kind, downloading, copy, paste, save, etc. is allowed.    All rights reserved!

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